World

World Futures: Profit, Non-Profit, Not-For-Profit Part 2

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
Previously we looked at individual bubbles in a bubble model with the definitive statements that they want and need to make a profit.
They need compensation, usually money, so that they can acquire other things for survival and ride the elevator of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.
They want to avoid pain while seeking pleasure. Profit, as used here, means making a living or money by producing or buying or selling goods and services.
An individual selling his or her labor (getting a job) is in the business of him or herself, with most of the governmental

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Explore Asteroids Friday; Saturday In Planetarium

Explore the risks asteroids pose to Earth and what mankind might be able to do about them Friday and Saturday at the Los Alamos Nature Center. Local asteroid expert Galen Gisler will lead a talk at 6 p.m. Friday, May 24, and the nature center will show the full-dome film ‘Incoming!’ at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 25. Courtesy/PEEC
 
PEEC News:
 
Explore the risks asteroid impacts pose to the Earth this Friday and Saturday at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium. At 6 p.m., Friday, May 24 astronomer Galen Gisler will host a talk about the effects of asteroid impacts and what mankind

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Giant Impact Caused Difference In Moon’s Hemispheres

Artist’s depiction of a collision between two planetary bodies. New research suggests the stark difference between the Moon’s heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the nearside were caused by a wayward dwarf planet colliding with the Moon in the early history of the solar system. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The stark difference between the Moon’s heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades.
 
Now, new evidence about the Moon’s crust suggests

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Senate Intel Committee Passes 2020 Intelligence Authorization Act

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. This week, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) voted to advance the Damon Paul Nelson and Matthew Young Pollard Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 2018, 2019 and 2020.
 
This legislation, which unanimously passed the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, authorizes funding for key intelligence priorities, including programs to address threats emanating from Russia, North Korea, China, and Iran, and enhances congressional oversight of the U.S. Intelligence Community.
 
Sen. Heinrich

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Daily Postcard: Full Flower Blue Moon Spotted Saturday

This shot of the Full Flower Blue Moon was taken about 3:40 a.m. Saturday in White Rock. A Blue Moon rarely appears blue in the sky, and the name actually has little to do with its color. Usually, a full moon occurs just once a month. Sometimes—about every three years or so—one month will have two full moons. This phenomenon is what is called a Calendrical Blue Moon. But that’s not the case this May. According to the Farmers’ Almanac, each of the four seasons typically contains three full moons. However, sometimes a season will have four. When that happens, the third full moon of that season


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AGU: Study Finds 24 Percent Of West Antarctic Ice Is Now Unstable

An iceberg at Marguerite Bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. New research finds 24 percent of West Antarctic ice is now unstable. Courtesy/Andrew Shepherd
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study.
 
Scientists at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM), based at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, have combined 25 years of European Space Agency satellite altimeter measurements and a model of

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World Futures: Profit, Non-Profit, Not-for-Profit – Part 1

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
Inferring from the title, one might anticipate this series is about businesses. It is and it is not.
 
It is in that as humanity developed, trade became essential. It is not because humanity has a need to survive and that requires working together in an “organized” manner. Perhaps this is better visualized with the bubble model I am fond of.
Checking today, there are 7.7 billion living people on the world. These are individual bubbles bouncing around with dependence on other bubbles and the “fluid” they are in. When people get together

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RSF Welcomes Investigation Into Chinese State Television Network CGTN For Airing Forced Confessions

Former British journalist and private investigator Peter Humphrey was detained in China in 2013 and forced to confess to alleged crimes on air in 2014. Courtesy/RSF
 
RSF News:
 
RSF welcomes the launch of an investigation by the United Kingdom’s audiovisual regulation authority (Ofcom) on Chinese state television network CGTN for airing forced confessions.
 
The United Kingdom’s Office of Communications (Ofcom) announced May 9 that they are investigating China Global Television Network’s (CGTN) possible violation of broadcasting regulations. The Chinese state channel

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Los Alamos Rotary Youth Exchange Student Lisa Schutt Of Switzerland Presents Program On Academic Year

Youth Exchange student Lisa Schutt of Switzerland, sponsored by the Rotary Club of Los Alamos, presented a program May 14 about her academic year at Los Alamos High School as it now comes to an end. She will return home to Maeinfeld in three weeks. Schutt said that highlights of her year here included making so many new friends in Los Alamos and through Rotary Youth Exchange activities across the state, visiting the Grand Canyon and San Diego, attending Homecoming and being on the Rotary Club float in the parade, and discovering breakfast burritos. Based upon school requirements


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La Niña’s Effect On Droughts Traced To U.S. Civil War

Max Torbenson coring a bristlecone pine in central Colorado. Photo by Daniel Griffin
 
AGU News:
 
Cyclical variations in wind and sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean may have contributed to a drought that played an important role in the outcome of the U.S. Civil War, according to a new study.
 
The new research used tree ring data to reconstruct the influence of El Niño and La Niña conditions on droughts across North America for the past 350 years, including during the American Civil War.
 
The Civil War drought – one of the worst to afflict the U.S. in centuries – occurred

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